Round and About: February 2002. (Frontline)

Article excerpt

London

British History Unit Seminars

February 4th, 18th. 5.30pm

London School of Economics
Houghton Street, London
WC2A 2AE

Tel: 020 7955 7073

Janet Hunter (LSE) talks on `Britain and the Japanese Economy in the First World War' on the 4th, followed by Alan Booth (University of Essex) on the why `British Manufacturing did not fail in the Golden Age' in this month's seminars held at Connaught House, Aldwych, London WC2.

William Beckford

February 6th to April 14th

Dulwich Picture Gallery
Gallery Road, London
SE21 7AD

Tel: 020 8693 5254

www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk

The eccentric collector William Beckford (1760-1844) was known as `England's wealthiest son'. He filled his magnificent Gothic extravaganza, Fonthill Abbey, with the most exceptional art treasures spanning many periods and styles, from medieval, to Oriental and the Renaissance. Following a scandal involving another man, Beckford left England and spent a decade on the Continent, only to return and become a recluse. His life and significance as a collector are the subject of this major exhibition at Dulwich.

London Furniture: Study Day

February 16th, 10.30-4.30

The Geffrye Museum
Kingsland Road
London E2 SEA

Tel: 020 7739 9893

www.geffrye-museum.org.uk

London in the late-17th and early-18th centuries was a mecca for skilled European and English craftsmen as well as a hub of international trade. The rising prosperity of London's merchants and professionals created a market for new styles and innovations in consumer goods, not least in furniture. The latest research and opinions on the furniture of this period will be discussed here by curators and experts.

Seeing Things: Photographing Objects, 1840-2001

February 20th to August 31st

The V&A Museum
Cromwell Road
London SW7 2RL

Tel: 020 7942 2000

www.vam.ac.uk

Famous and lesser known photographs explore the range of ways photographers have used -- and still use -- objects to compose memorable images whether in terms of documentary, fine art, advertising or portraiture. The exhibition features many works by the great practitioners of the medium, such as Henry Talbot, Man Ray, Henri Cartier-Bresson as well as lesser known photographers of today.

American Sublime: Landscape Painting in the US 1820-80

February 21st to May 19th

Tate Britain
Millbank
LondonSW1P 4RG

Tel:020 7887 8000

www.tate.org.uk

Little appreciated in Britain as a genre since the 19th century, this body of dramatic, large-scale paintings was inspired by the splendour and variation of the newly conquered American landscape, as well as by the European Romantic movement.

Earl of Essex Conference

February 23rd, 9.30am-5pm

New Armouries
Tower of London
London EC3N 4AB
Tickets from Alison Head on
020 8781 9780

This one-day conference, open to the public, explores the rise and fall of the Earl of Essex, and complements the current exhibition, `"This Popular Traitor": the Execution of the Earl of Essex' in the White Tower (conference tickets also include admission to this). Dr Ian Archer, Sir Roy Strong and Dr Susan Brigden are among the experts who will address the conference, looking at Essex in relation to literature, art and music, as well as in a political and social context.

Sex Observed: the Venetian Ambassadors and the Six Wives of Henry VIII

February 26th, 7pm

Royal Geographical Society
1 Kensington Gore,
London SW7 2AR

Telephone 020 7636 6138 for
ticket information

David Starkey delivers this lecture on the marital history of Henry VIII as seen through the eyes of the Venetian visitors to the Tudor court. …