State by State: A Roundup of Activities

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ALABAMA

Educators will explore how history, music, art, and literature influence culture. At a teacher workshop in Mobile from June 9 through 15, professor of French Catherine Danielou and professor of Spanish Sheri Spaine Long of the University of Alabama at Birmingham will lead K-12 Spanish, French, and Latin teachers in a discussion about language and culture.

Writers and scholars will compare memoirs, biographies, nonfiction novels, and poetry by Alabama authors during the fifth annual Alabama Writers Symposium. The Harper Lee Award for Alabama's Distinguished Writer 2002 and the Eugene Current-- Garcia Award for Alabama's Distinguished Literary Scholar 2002 will be presented. The symposium will be held May 2 through 4 in Monroeville.

The traveling Smithsonian exhibition "Yesterday's Tomorrows: Past Visions of the American Future" is a historical look at how Americans have viewed the twentieth century. It will be on display in Tuskegee from May 3 to June 14.

ARIZONA

"One Book Arizona" is a statewide initiative that encourages Arizonans to read and discuss books at public libraries. The program kicks off with Animal Dreams by Tucson author Barbara Kingsolver. Project activities throughout May include readings, panel discussions, and a traveling exhibition.

FLORIDA

Educator Earl Shorris will discuss the efforts of universities and community organizations to provide college-level humanities courses to low-income students. His lecture is one of four public programs conducted by Valencia Community College in an endeavor to diminish poverty through humanities learning. The lecture is May 9 at Valencia Community College in Orlando.

ILLINOIS

"Trekking through Time: Archeology and the Lower Illinois River Valley," a teacher's seminar, will be held from June 16 through 21 in Kampsville. Conducted by the Center for American Archeology, the seminar will allow teachers to explore Illinois history through archeological excavations, lectures, readings, and field trips.

In the living history series "Heartland Chautauqua: Jazz Age," scholars will perform as historical figures from the 1920s, presenting the musical, literary, scientific, and social innovations of the era. Co-sponsored by the Missouri Humanities Council, the series runs from June 3 through 8 in Monmouth, June 10 through 15 in Jacksonville, and June 17 through 22 in Marshall.

Art critic Andrew Patner will discuss Handel's eighteenth-century opera, Semele, as part of the Chicago Opera Theater lecture series, an outreach program for the promotion of lifelong learning in the arts. The lecture will be held at the Chicago Cultural Center on May 2. On May 8, 10, 12, 16, and 18, the opera's director and conductor will discuss Semele at the Anthenaeum Theater.

Photojournalist D. Gorton's images of the Cache River region will be featured in the exhibition "Lands of the Cache" from May 3 through June 14 at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale. The exhibition will open with a lecture by Dr. Jane Adams.

Performing Arts Chicago will present the film series "CineDance 2002: The European Avant-Garde Influence," May 3 through 9 at the Gene Siskel Film Center. The series chronicles European influence in dance and features the works of choreographers Anna Teresa DeKeersmaeker, Wim Vandekeybus, Edouard Lock, and Lloyd Newson.

Several Road Scholar lectures will be offered throughout May and June, including "Aging: Literary Insights into Growing Older" by John Hallwas in Moline on May 3, and "Chicago's Public Sculpture" by Michelle Paluch-- Mishur in Darien on June 6.

Illinois's Dutch Days Festival will be held May 3 through 5 in Fulton. A festival workshop will examine the Dutch and Irish cultural history of Illinois through traditional costumes and dance performances.

To complement the exhibition "American Indian Portraits," a display of seventy oil paintings by Chicago artist Elbridge Ayer Burbank, the Newberry Library continues its series of programs on the portrayal of American Indians by non-Indians. …