Renaissance of a Jazz Master/live at the Montreal Bistro Toronto/souvenir - Gene Dinovi Plays the Music of Benny Carter/gene Dinovi Plays Duke Elington and Billy Strayhorn Live with Dave Young

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RENAISSANCE OF A JAZZ MASTER

THE GENE DINOVI TRIO

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Gene DiNovi (p) Dave Young (b) Terry Clarke (d), Phase One Studio Toronto, March 31 1993

A Cockeyed Optimist/Springsville/Till the Clouds Roll By/ Right as the Rain/Bill/It Never Entered My Mind/Budding Memories/Elegy/My Old Flame/Have a Heart/Speak Low TT 61:50

LIVE AT THE MONTREAL BISTRO TORONTO

THE GENE DINOVI TRIO

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Gene DiNovi (p) Dave Young (b) Terry Clarke (d), Montreal Bistro Toronto, October 20-22 1993

Introduction by Ted O'Reilly/T.N.T./Happy Harvest/The Things We Did Last Summer - Indian Summer/Terry's Little Tune/Nieves/A Tune for Mac/A.B.'s Blues/It Happened In Monterey/You Better Go Now/Coffee Time/Tiny's Blues TT 64:40

SOUVENIR - GENE DINOVI PLAYS THE MUSIC OF BENNY CARTER

GENE DINOVI

HEP CD 2076

Gene DiNovi (p), CTS Studio London, June 1 1999

Horizon/Wonderland/Souvenir/When Lights Are Low/ There Where the Warm Wind Blows/Only Trust Your Heart/People Time/Superstar/Blues In My Heart/I See You/Conversation TT 69:15

NOTE: All compositions by Benny Carter except Conversation by DiNovi.

GENE DINOVI PLAYS DUKE ELINGTON AND BILLY STRAYHORN LIVE WITH DAVE YOUNG

BALDWIN STREET MUSIC BJC-205

Gene DiNovi (p) Dave Young (b), Montreal Bistro Toronto, April 24-25 2002

Tomorrow Mountain/Introduction/Raincheck/Introduction/ Morning Glory/Introduction/Cop Out/Introduction/Single Petal of a Rose - A Flower Is a Lovesome Thing/Johnny Come Lately/Introduction/Passion Flower/Lady Mac/ Introduction/Isfahan/I'm Beginning To see the Light/ Chelsea Bridge - Warm Valley TT 76:47

In 1945 at the age of seventeen, pianist Gene DiNovi recorded for the first time with an eclectic seven piece group led by Joe Marsala. On the two sides issued, East of the Sun and a boppish variation on How High the Moon called Slightly Dizzy, he comped expertly and played remarkably mature solos. During the better part of the next decade, he played and recorded with many of the giants of the period but in the fifties, having become acutely aware of the perils and the insecurity of the jazz life, began to concentrate on the more stable if less colorful career as an accompanist to popular singers. …