The Summing Up and Awards of the Second Tehran International Film Festival

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THE CLOSING SESSION

The closing session of the second Tehran International Film Festival was held in the Arya Sheraton hotel, in the presence of Empress Farah Pahlavi. The highlight of the evening was the presentation of the Jury's report and the award of prizes by Her Imperial Majesty.

The second Tehran International Film Festival, which ran from Nov. 26 to Dec. 6, 1973, was recognized by the International Federation of Film Producers' Associations as a competitive event for features and short films, and was organized by the Iranian Ministry of Culture and Arts through its affiliated Festival Organization.

A total of over 100 films from 36 countries were shown in the competition, information and retrospective sections. In addition, 120 films from 20 countries were shown in the associated film market.

More than 300 guests came to Iran for the Festival. They included leading directors, producers, actors, critics and film executives representing 47 countries.

The following countries were represented in the Festival: Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Ceylon, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Egypt, Ethiopia, Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, France, Gabon, German Democratic Republic, Greece, Hong Kong, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iran, Italy, Japan, Lebanon, Malagasy, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, Pakistan, Philippines, Poland, Republic of Korea, Romania, Senegal, South West Africa, Spain, Surinam, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Tanzania, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, Uganda, U.A.R., U.S.S.R., United Kingdom, United States, Venezuela and Yugoslavia.

FILMS IN COMPETITION

Altogether, 19 countries were represented in the competition section, with 13 short films and 18 feature-length films. None of these had been shown competitively before in international festivals.

The short films in competition consisted of the following: The Way Hardy Bulber Bought a Proper Future (F.R.G.), Pollution (Iran), Piet Mondrian (Netherlands), Bannerfilm (Canada), 28 Above Below (Canada), You Said It (India), More (U.S.A.), Au-Auto (F.R.G.), Collector (Yugoslavia), Jacques Fayder and His Masterpiece (Belgium), Brainwash (Netherlands) and The Face (Czechoslovakia).

The feature-length films in competition were: The Stone Wedding (Romania), Joana the Frenchwoman (Brazil), A Simple Event (Iran), Sounder (U.S.A.), Walking Tall (U.S.A.), Teresa the Thief (Italy), Ape and Super Ape (Netherlands), The Bride (Turkey), Time Within Memory (Japan), Lucky Luciano (Italy), Private Projection (France), The Optimists (U.K.), The Stepmother (U.S.S.R.), Libido (Australia), Mean Streets (U.S.A.), With Closed Eyes (France), Celestial Bodies (Canada) and The Mongols (Iran).

INFORMATION secTION

This section consisted of films made before April, 1972, or which had been shown at international festivals in competition, or which were chosen to enhance the informative value of the event. Eighteen short films and 20 feature films were shown in this section.

RETROSPECTIVES

The objective of the Retrospective section of the Festival is to pay tribute to an artist, group, organization or country "for the expansion of the possibilities of the language of film or to emphasize the importance of a period, a school, a style or a particular genre of film-making in the history of cinema." This year there were three parts to the Retrospective section, the works of directors René Clair and Frank Capra, and a 'Panorama of African Cinema'.

The 11 films of René Clair that were shown were Les Grandes Manoeuvres, Paris Qui Dort, Entr'acte, Sous Les Toits de Paris, Le Million, A Nous Ia Libertè, 14 Juillet, Le Silence est d'Or, La Beautè du Diable, Belles de Nuit and Porte des Lilas. …