African American Education from A to Z

Article excerpt

African American Education From A to Z

This unique, well-organized and well documented work is an essential source about African American education that fills a noticeable gap in resources in this area. It brings together a collection of laws, biographies, concepts, journals, movements, organizations, and institutions from varied sources and presents them in a single, useful volume.

The Encyclopedia of African American Education covers such topics as "The Little Rock Nine," "Ideological Origins of African American Education," "Voting Rights Act of 1965," "Shad Sisters of Washington, D.C.," "Teachers, African American, Recruitment and Shortages," "Underclass," "Self-Concept Development and Education," "Self Help Tradition, African Americans," as well as the "Yale Child Study Center," and "A Better Chance, Inc."

A key feature of the work is the extensive number of public laws related to the education of African Americans with full-text location in The United States Statutes At Large, The United Supreme Court Reports, and the like. The selected bibliography and the names of the authors at the end of each section provide additional options for research on the topic. Also, the bibliography at the end of the volume includes many excellent works for further readings.

The encyclopedia is a scholarly work developed by world renowned authors such as historians Rayford W. Logan and Michael R. Winston, and Richard Kluger, author of Simple Justice. Logan, Winston and Kluger focused on Charles Hamilton -- who, in addition to serving as editor of the Harvard Law Review, was a key counselor of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). In fact, Hamilton helped plan the organization's campaign against racial segregation in public schools that culminated in the U.S. Supreme Court's 1954 ruling in Brown v. The Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas.

Discussions about multicultural education are at the forefront of many aspects of our society -- from the early education of children to the halls of academe, from employment offices to businesses and industries. Margo Okazawa-Rey defines this broad category of theories and practices by looking at the history of the development of the term, major principles on which multicultural education rest, and strategies for bringing about a multicultural society. Users of this work will find discussions of the impact of European and European Americans on the overall society, the problems of schooling, the goal of intergroup education, and comments about critics of multicultural education.

Some of the uniqueness of this book is reflected in a section on "White-Flight" authored by Faustine C. Jones-Wilson. Because many works in the social sciences have limited or no coverage of such topics, educators, sociologists, business specialists and people with similar interests will find this an excellent tool for identifying, defining and explaining many terms related to the phenomenon of White families fleeing desegregated schools. …