Faculty Drive the High Education Standards of the Institute

Article excerpt

IF ETHICS AND EDUCATION STAND FOR CORE VALUES OF THE INSTITUTE, THEN THOSE RARE AND TALENTED INDIVIDUALS WHO TEACH IREM EDUCATION COURSES PROVIDE THE MEANS BY WHICH THE INSTITUTE CAN TRAIN REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS TO ACHIEVE EXCELLENCE IN THE INDUSTRY.

While a host of factors in the marketplace have required changes to IREM's education over the years, IREM faculty members have consistently played a vital role in ensuring the quality of the IREM education experience within the real estate management industry.

For much of IREM's history-1935-2000-courses were taught by faculty in the classroom, with many also offered in a home study format for course credit. The first education offering was held in Chicago in 1935, with future courses offered throughout the country. The early founders of IREM appreciated the need to provide formal and professional training to those individuals managing property in the chaotic days of the 1930s.

While the country focused on war for most of the 1940s the Institute still carried on its educational mission for much of the decade. But it wasn't until after the war ended and a building and baby boom were in high gear that the need for professional real estate management-especially in the areas of single-family housing-became apparent.

During the 1950s, students were required to take additional courses to earn their CPM designation, including a course on management principles and an exam. The Institute also required students take the course, "Developing and Managing Investment Property," which included a text paired with the course. Later in time, such a combination of courses with texts would bring in significant revenues to IREM.

As more IREM education courses were developed for the market, the Institute also began formalizing its faculty structure and training accordingly. This would continue throughout the decades.

The 1960s brought about an even greater need for specialized knowledge and courses for prospective members as more property types came to market. The Institute created four principle courses:

* Practical Methods for Successful Property Management

* Analysis and Management of Investment Property

* Executive Management Seminar on Developing Maximum Potential in Investment Properties

* Office Building Development, Leasing and Management

By the early 1970s the real estate industry saw an expansion of condominium living in urban areas of the United States. This trend influenced IREM's decision to expand its course subject matter to cover more on the residential sector. By 1974, IREM had adopted the Accredited Residential Manager (ARM®) Program, and most courses were being offered in week-long tracks with two faculty members on-site. Again, with the expansion of course offerrings, training requirements for faculty increased to include two days of instruction followed by one day of presentation. Faculty members also had to pass the ARM exam.

During the 1980s, the week-long courses and variety of offerings continued through IREM headquarters and chapters as the market demand increased. Accordingly, IREM increased the requirements for the faculty training. Along with the faculty training requirements of the 1970s, potenrial faculty members now needed to present their skills on videotape one time during their training and were required to teach with another instructor at least once before they could instruct in a classroom on their own.

After decades of offering courses in these formats, the Institute implemented sweeping changes to its course formats in the mid-1990s. While IREM's membership was mixed in its support of such changes, a number of market factors-backed by a research study conducted by a consulting firm retained by IREM-led to the change of course offerings into one- or two-day seminars, rather than the week-long team seminars.

IREM faculty continued to train and work closely with the Institute through the significant changes within the education area. …