Curricula: Lesson 1: Multiculturalism and Canada's North

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Key Concepts and Issues:

Students will explore the concept of multiculturalism and how it connects to issues surrounding Canada's North.

Subjects:

Multiculturalism and Canada's North

Grade Level:

Grades 9to 12

Duration:

5to 8 classes

Curriculum Links:

Social Studies, World History World Geography

Introduction:

The goal is for students to reflect on their understanding of multiculturalism and learn how it connects to Canada's North, including Canada's sovereignty in the north. Students will explore the role of the lnuit and Aboriginal peoples as stewards of Canada's north and share ways to support and enhance this role. By participating in this activity, students will research to learn more about the culture of these fellow Canadians. They will gain a better understanding of how they have been the traditional stewards of Canada's North and reflect on whether they may be best equipped to continue as the stewards of Canada's North.

Project North Graphic Novel: Canadian Sovereignty in the Arctic is structured in sections to mirrorthe themes and issues in the four lessons. It follows the progress of Alex and ZaZi as they work to help their country by finding a solution to protecting Canada's sovereignty in the North. They are discovering information and putting together a white paperto submitto an online summit on Sovereignty in Canada's North. As students in class complete a challenge, pages of the graphic novel are then 'unlocked' so students can follow along with the story. Familiarize yourself with the graphic novel before beginning the lessons with the students. Assign the relevant pages as they explore each lesson.

Materials Required:

computers with Internet access detailed map of Canada's North: http://maps. nationalgeographic.com/maps/atlas/north-america-geophysical.html writing paper and utensils

Expectations/Outcomes :

Students will:

* increase their knowledge of Canadian history and geography

* analyze major issues involving the rights, responsibilities, roles, and status of individual citizens and groups in a local, national and global context

* explain, analyze, and compare the effectiveness of various methods of influencing public policy

* explore the concept of protecting Canadian identity and sovereignty

* examine one or more aspects of multiculturalism in the Canadian context

Background

The concept of sovereignty is an evolving one. It has traditionally focused on the rights of a country to control a territory (the land and its inhabitants) legitimately without interference from other countries. Now, instead of focusing on rights, sovereignty is being considered in terms of responsibilities, especially the responsibility of a country to protect, and have authority over, its territory and to be perceived as protecting it and having authority over it. Sovereignty is also thoughtto include stewardship over the territory.

Forthousands of years, Canada's North has been home to lnuitand Aboriginal peoples. Their unique culture, one of many within Canada, is a reflection of their northern environment and their close relationship with the land.

" The concept of the land included not just the earth itself, but all of nature: plants, animals, water, ice, wind and sky. Nature and lnuitare one. They have depended on each other for centuries and any and any change or alteration to just one aspect can unbalance the whole." - Innuuqatigitt curriculum, page 31

While climate change in the North is affecting the way of the lnuit people in a detrimental way, it is also drawing international attention to the North as a possible North-West passage is emerging. Thus, what is detrimental to the culture and even survival of the lnuit may be of economic benefitto others.

Step One: Teacher-Led Discussion

Begin with a general discussion about multiculturalism and what it means. …