Leadership Direction Service: National Catholic Educational Association 2010 Annual Report

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NCEA BY THE NUMBERS

CATHOLIC SCHOOLS

Total Catholic school enrollment: 2,065,872

Elementary school enrollment: 1,467,694

Secondary school enrollment: 598,178

Minority students: 624,878 30.2%

Non-Catholic: 307,458 14.9%

Total number of schools: 6,980

Elementary schools: 5,774

Secondary schools: 1,206

New schools in 2009/10: 34

New schools in last 1 0 years: 463

Schools with waiting lists for admission: (26.1%) 1,822

Full-time professional staff 151,473

Average Tuition

Elementary: $3,383

Secondary: $8,787

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

Non-parochial school Catholic elementary students: 3,055,645

Non-parochial school Catholic secondary students: 687,174

Directors of Religious Education: (Estimate) 13,000

BOARDS, COMMISSIONS, COUNCILS OF CATHOLIC EDUCATION

Number of boards: 5,749

Schools with boards: 82.4%

CATHOLIC COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

Number of colleges/universities: 234

Students: 768,541

SEMINARIES

Total Seminary enrollment: 3,483

Diocesan candidates in Theology: 2,656

Religious candidates in Theology: 827

High School enrollment: 510

College level enrollment: 1,443

Graduate-level Theologates: 46

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

THIS ANNUAL REPORT IS A SALUTE to an outstanding NCEA program: the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Awards. Iwenry years ago the association established the Awards to recognize individuals who have made exceptional contributions to U.S. education vouth in general ind to Catholic education in particular. Since 1991, 130 have been honored including Barbara Bush, Father Ted Hesburgh, Beverly Sills and Peter Lynch.

What binds these individuals together is their passion for Catholic education and their determination to strengthen our schools and preserve them lor the next generation. Many of them are deeply committed ro religious education programs, colleges and seminaries as well - Catholic education at all levels. TIi e goal ol the Seton Awards is not only to applaud this commitment but to encourage others to follow in their footsteps.

This year NCEA also recognized the Archdiocese of New Orleans with the President s Award for the leadership and spirit ol the archdiocese and its schools in the aftermath or Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Five years ago almost every school was touched in some way whether through direct damage, enrollment shuts or a daunting future. Yet Catholic schools defied the odds and were back in operation within five weeks.

This accomplishment not only reflected the vision of the archdiocesan leaders, but underscored the power of site-based management, with school principals and stari embracing the challenge and understanding that the key ro saving the city was restoring education.

There are many attributes that set Catholic education apart. I think the amazing courage, character and steadfastness of our educators is singular. It does not surprise me that these same characteristics are shared by the extraordinary Seton honorees we have saluted during the past twenty years.

Karen M. Ristati. Ed.D.

President

ABOUT THE NATIONAL CATHOLIC EDUCATIONAL ASSOCIATION

Diocesan leaders, principals, teachers, college presidents, directors of religious education, board members, pastors, parents and seminary directors are among the more than 200,000 members of the National CatJiolic Educational Association. These educators have a vast influence on the nation. They serve more than 7 million students at all levels of Catholic education.

The first Seton award went to Barbara Bush, pictured with Sr. Catherine McNamee, NCEA president, and Seton Scholar in 1991.

LEADERSHIP. DIRECTION. SERVICE.

A spirited rendition of "God Bless America" led by David Bologna brought the 2Qih anniversary celebration of ihe NCEA St. …