Philosophy, Science, and Technology of Mission in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. A Missiological Encyclopedia. Part 2: Missionary Theology

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Philosophy, Science, and Theology of Mission in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. A Missiological Encyclopedia. Part 2: Missionary Theology.

By Jan A. B. Jongeneel. Frankfurt and New York: Peter Lang, 1997. Pp. Xxii, 428. DM llS. This is the second volume of the author's massive Missiological Encyclopedia, first published in Dutch in 1991. It is not a general encyclopedia of missions but rather a handbook of missiology, or the study of mission(s). Volume 1 (reviewed here in October 1995, pp. 182-83), dealt with the philosophy of mission and the science of mission. Volume 2 deals with the theology of mission, which, the author maintains, "in recent decades, has been transformed into missionary theology" (p. 1). He defines "missionary theology" as "that form or type of Christian theology which . . . reflects upon the relations of Christians and churches with . . . adherents and communities of other religions, worldviews, and ideologies in all spheres of private and public life" (p. 10). After an introductory chapter that deals with the definitions, history, context, and structure of missionary theology, the bulk of the book is devoted to discussion of what the author describes as "the ten branches of missionary theology," which include missionary ascetics, missionary dogmatics, missionary ethics, missionary catechetics, missionary liturgics, and missionary homiletics. …