Should Men Still Be Chivalrous? Was Chivalry Extinguished by the World Wars or Does It Live On?

Article excerpt

Byline: Jamie Brown jamie.brown@northernstar.com.au

IT SEEMS the only place you'll find male chivalry is at a taxi rank, where drivers like Anton Van Leuven help women like Rachel Smith load their groceries into the boot.

In fact, talk to most women and they'll agree that chivalry is dead. Gone just like the generation of people who preceded us.

Queensland University of Technology experts in human behaviour have proved that chivalry actually died a long time ago, during last century's world wars that caused so much terror on the high seas.

Professor Benn Torgler and his research team compared the sinking of the Titanic, which took more than two hours to drop beneath the waves, and the Lusitania which took only 18 minutes, and found chivalry - or the male species desire to put women and children's needs ahead of their own - takes place only in certain circumstances.

When it comes to the crunch, they found, male chivalry was sacrificed for personal survival. …