Indian Culture Inspires Artist's Inhabited Space

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aroundthe

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with Sandy Pottinger

sandypottinger

@bigpond.com

ART exhibitions can sometimes take us beyond the familiar, not necessarily through content, but by way of challenging our complacencies and showing us a new way of looking at the art object.

This may be the artist's intention, it may be that the artist is pursuing some eclectic or obscure theory, or it may just happen because of our own response to image, colour, or texture.

The Crow's Nest Regional Art Gallery is presenting the exhibition, Inhabited Space, a series of wall and sculpture works by Sandra Jarrett.

The exhibition has architectonic overtones in that ordered space is the predominant structure complemented by controlled, rhythmic patterns of decoration.

The work, which suits the small spare gallery, comprises six meditations all of which draw on decorative aspects of Indian culture.

A series of four panels iced with white paisley designs hover from the wall.

These are based on the fretwork-like screens that the artist saw on a recent visit to Rajasthan.

There is a cube of alacea containing a carved golden rose on a small, elegant column.

The cube has an intriguing weightlessness and seems to levitate from its plinth. A small framed meditation contains a fragment of lacy scrim and a tiny gold hamsa, the Hand of Fatima that wards off evil intentions.

It is mounted on tapered plinths that accentuate its presence with a sense of reverence.

The seventh work, a floor piece called Spirit House is less resolved.

The black metal armature is intrusive and cumbersome and detracts from the understated restrained composure of the other work. …