Mega Resort's Progress Rests in Quoll's Paws

Article excerpt

Byline: JENNA CAIRNEY

A TURTLE and a couple of fish species was all it took for the Federal Government to put the Queensland Government back in its box and scrap the Traveston Crossing Dam.

The orange-bellied parrot halted wind farms, the spotted handfish stopped waterway development and a tiny, blind spider-like creature stopped a mine.

But the local question is, can the spotted tailed quoll stop the construction of mega resort Cherrabah?

A spokeswoman for the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities yesterday confirmed that the application for the massive development at Elbow Valley had been brought before the department because it was likely to have a significant impact and must be assessed.

Though she couldn't give a timeline for a decision, she said the resort owners would have to prepare a detailed assessment.

C[pounds sterling]The timing of the assessment depends on how long it takes for the developer to provide the documentation needed for the assessment,C[yen] she said.

C[pounds sterling]Once all the required documentation has been compiled for the assessment, it will be open for public comment for a minimum period of 10 business days.C[yen]

The Chinese owners of Cherrabah, Joyful View Garden Real Estate, will have to advertise on their website and in the newspaper of this period.

The Minister, or a delegate of the Minister, then has 40 business days to decide whether or not to approve the proposed action.

The Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 manages matters of national significance such as nationally threatened species.

Cherrabah is considered one of the only strongholds in south Queensland, according to reports. …