Book Reviews

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NEW FICTION How The Trouble Started by Robert Williams is published in paperback by Faber and Faber, priced pounds 12.99. Available now.

Donald is eight when what he refers to as "the trouble" begins. There is an accident, then there are the police and a barrage of questions - the upshot of all of it being that Donald and his mum are uprooted from their community.

Eight years later, and Donald is still a child in many ways, unable to move on from that fateful day. Something of a loner, he strikes up a friendship with a quiet, vulnerable schoolboy with a love of horror stories, not realising that anyone might not approve of him spending time with Jake.

Our view of Donald changes as we see more of his character and his life - slowly peeling away the label that society has burdened him with.

Robert Williams, award-winning writer of Luke and Jon, presents the reader with subtle questions on the issue of morality, loneliness and trying to do the right thing.

It is not a hugely original story but author Colgan (actually chick-lit novelist Jenny Colgan, of West End Girls fame) keeps the story moving nicely without ponderous sections which Book Reviews His sensitive portrayal of a childhood interrupted and tarnished with tragedy is deeply moving, a feeling amplified by the sense of place and detail he creates.

It may not be an easy read, but it is most definitely an engaging one.

Doctor Who: Dark Horizons by JT Colgan is published in hardback by BBC Books, priced pounds 12.99. Available now.

A page turner for the fans and perhaps for more casual viewers of the series, but Dark Horizons may not come to be known as a Doctor Who classic, although it's an entertaining adventure for Matt Smith's Doctor. …