Errors and Omissions won,COt Be Accepted

Article excerpt

BACK at my desk after a three-week break, I find myself wondering how many readers remember E&OE.

This was the obligatory CyErrors and Omissions ExceptedCO abbreviation at the end of business letters way back when they were typed on the ponderous old Royals, Underwoods and Remingtons.

Now, in consideration for the DailyCOs sub-editors, I find myself thinking that as a belated New Year resolution, I should perhaps type E&OE at the end of these weekly musings Co or for that matter, everything I write.

Why? Because after belatedly re-reading an email I had sent to a friend. I saw I had written that I wasnCOt feeling Cytoo godCO. Far from being an admission of godlessness, this was the latest reminder that my eyesight is going downhill at a rate of knots; and this is only one of many indicators of advancing years.

My typing fingers, for example, are no longer nimble, and as for thumbs, once used by typists only to hit the space bar, I am both amazed and awed by the dexterity now shown by the users of mobile phones and their digital derivatives.

C[pounds sterling]All thumbs and no fingersC[yen] was once a derogatory comment on clumsiness. Not any more. The boot is now on the other foot, or rather, the glove on the other hand.

Try as I might, I cannot avoid errors when I try to dial with a thumb, so I have to use the Cyfind-and-peckCO technique.

However, my difficulties are as nought compared with the problems faced by so many of todayCOs schoolchildren, and yes, so many Gen X, Y and Z-ers, with readinCO, writinCO and stuff.

Therefore, I felt sadness and satisfaction in the prominence given in the national media late last month to what is all too plainly a nationwide inadequacy in the teaching of reading. …