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Arizona and Colorado were second and third in growth among states during the 1990s, on a percentage basis. Voters in both states rejected stringent "anti-sprawl" measures on Nov. 7.

This runs contrary to the assertions of the no-growthers who say that Americans are fed up with urban sprawl and secretly long to return to the crime and congestion of the cities.

Jamming people into densely packed communities where their lives will be ordered by government planners is said to be the wave of the future.

It also was the wave of the past.

Americans migrated from the farms and rural areas to the cities in the early part of the last century, but in the second half, enabled by progress, they fled to the outskirts of those cities, seeking more space, cleaner air and less crime.

Recently, the Political Economy Research Center held a conference for scholars and writers, who issued a statement of principles they call the "Lone Mountain Compact." Among the more than 100 who signed the document were Randall Holcombe, Florida State University economics professor, and Stan Marshall of the James Madison Institute. …