Oklahoma's Ranking of State Government Web Sites Rises

Article excerpt

Some state government Web sites, including Oklahoma's, are offering the public more online access to information, but since Sept. 11 of last year increased attention to security has led to creation of more restricted-access areas, according to the third annual "e-government" study by Brown University.

Darrell West, director of the Taubman Center for Public Policy at Brown, and a team of public policy students reviewed 1,256 state and federal government sites, evaluating the variety and quality of electronic services they provide. Each was ranked on a 100-point scale.

Since last year's study, Oklahoma's ranking has risen 16 places, from 45th to 29th. Its point score has increased from 33.4 in 2001 to 44.9. Oklahoma was one of eight states whose scores rose more than 15 spots this year.

States were ranked on issues such as online services, attention to privacy and security, disability access, foreign language translation and Web site personalization capabilities, among others.

The most frequent and visible online service was the ability to file taxes online, offered by 47 states, including Oklahoma. Other frequently used online services included job applications, driver's license renewals, hunting and fishing licenses, business licenses, renewal of car tags and vehicle registrations, permits, birth and death certificates and the ability to order publications.

For many of these, Oklahoma agencies offer online access to forms and information, but not the capability of actually applying online. …