Holland Kicks off 2010 Knowledge and Project Management Symposium in Tulsa

Article excerpt

"I talk to them about their problems," Holland said on Wednesday. Holland focuses on helping executives launch initiatives to move their organizations to the next level of performance.

Holland, founder of Holland and Davis, a nationally recognized firm for implementing organizational change, kicked off the 2010 Knowledge and Project Management Symposium at the University of Tulsa campus.

The symposium continues on Thursday at the Alan Chapman Activity Center at TU.

Holland began publishing materials on the need for knowledge management 10 years ago. In his presentation, Holland discussed the significant "secrets" for implementing knowledge management, or KM, in an organization.

"Knowledge management is not a physical thing. You cannot count it, or stack it or inventory it," Holland said. "It is about retaining the people in an organization who know what is going on, who know where the information and resources are. It is about knowing what we know."

Knowledge management is a science of turning data to knowledge, saving it and transferring it through an organization," Holland said.

Organizations wind down by themselves unless owners and executives "put energy into them," Holland said.

"Knowledge is a corporate asset that is to be developed, protected and exploited," Holland said.

The strategic direction of the company determines the value of corporate knowledge, Holland said.

"Knowledge only produces value as it is used in the company's work processes," Holland said.

Knowledge management allows employees to work more effectively to get better results, he said.

"To work more efficiently in order to lower costs, to work faster to lower cycle times and to work smarter for fewer recurring errors," Holland said.

Holland said effective knowledge performance should be required from all employees for KM to work.

"Share on the inside, protect from the outside," he said. …