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Earth Day Energy Crisis: Pakistan Plans Shorter Work Week, Curfews

Article excerpt

Facing a severe shortage of electricity, Pakistan will unveil an energy crisis plan on Earth Day that may include a shorter work week, a 9 p.m. curfew on wedding parties, curbs on air conditioner use, and rolling blackouts.

Amid fears that severe energy shortages could touch off riots, Pakistan will announce drastic measures this week to save electricity, including a shorter workweek and restrictions on nighttime wedding celebrations, government officials said Wednesday.

With power outages lasting up to 20 hours a day in cities and villages, halting industry and even farming in some places, the electricity crisis could further destabilize a vital U.S. ally. Already this year, there have been streets protests, some violent, resulting in at least one death, over the electricity stoppages.

"Children can't do their homework. Household work doesn't get done, as washing machines and other appliances cannot work. When you go home from work, you have no idea whether there will be electricity at home. Your whole life is disturbed," said Mahnaz Peracha of The Network for Consumer Protection, an independent Pakistani advocacy group.

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The Obama administration says that helping Pakistan surmount its electricity crisis is one of the top priorities of its aid effort.

Richard Holbrooke, the U.S. special representative for Pakistan and Afghanistan, said this week that Pakistan's electricity situation was "not acceptable" and that Washington would help to "the absolute limits of what Congress will fund. It is a big issue."

Pakistan has been crippled by a shortfall in electricity generation, producing only about 10,000 megawatts of the required 16,000 a day. Further, some generators aren't working at full capacity because the government owes money to power producers. The government is expected to inject around $1 billion into the system to pay its debts, but energy savings can't make up for the shortages until new plants come online. …