Castro Can't Disguise His Regime's Abuses

Article excerpt

Unlike the emperor, the dictator has clothes - and Cuba's Fidel Castro knows how to use them to manipulate American public opinion.

He wore his dark-blue suit and tie for the United Nations shindig and Bernie's TV show Sunday, then changed into his olive fatigues for the Harlem crowd.

No matter. Castro's spiffy outfits can't hide the cold, calculating mind of the megalomaniac.

Bernard Shaw, in his hour-long Cable News Network interview of Castro, treated him more gingerly and respectfully than the news media ever would treat any American president. The dictator gave his skewed view of poor little Cuba's relationship with big, bad Uncle Sam, and Shaw ate up Castro's historical distortions.

Castro was allowed to lie in response to questions about everything from the cause of the U.S. embargo to his involvement in exporting communist revolutions to Angola and Nicaragua.

Sample question: Why doesn't Cuba's political system allow political parties other than the Communists?

Castro answered with the standard 36-year-old line: A multiparty system isn't necessary, because Cubans can directly elect their representatives right from the neighborhood. Yep, democracy in action.

Shaw nodded and went on to the next question, when he had an opportunity to pursue the Castro lie. Everyone should know, after all, that the only people who can be elected to any office in Cuba are Communist Party members. People have no slate of candidates to pick from, and their vote is compulsory.

On to another query of the comandante: Why not step down for the sake of ending the U.S. embargo?

Why, nobody has asked me that, Castro said, with his cynical grin.

Again, no follow-up from Shaw. Yet every president since Richard Nixon has stated that the embargo would end if Castro's government conducted fair elections. …