It's Alive! Dissection of Human Cadavers Brings Anatomy Lessons to Life

Article excerpt

Students in a senior anatomy and physiology class at Duchesne High School recently watched surgeons dissect parts of the human body at the St. Louis Metropolitan Medical Society.

The session, said Beth Steagall, their teacher, "brings life to the sub jects we study in anatomy. They are able to see real human body parts, as opposed to diagrams and sheep parts that we usually use in the class."

During the three-hour session, the students, wearing 3-D glasses, watched the doctors on a large screen while they worked on the cadavers. "They get to see the doctors and ask them questions in a more personal light," said Steagall, hoping to raise the interest of students in the study of anatomy and how the body works. Senior Bridget Shea said she found the dissection of knee and shoulder joints interesting. And, she said, "A neurosurgeon talked about trauma and how things occur and how they alleviate them. It was pretty informative if you were considering a career in medicine because it showed how much de dication is in it, too. You have to be emotionally prepared to be in the profession to deal with traumatic occurrences. "It was a hands-on application. In school, you don't see firsthand experience like the doctors have. It gives you a practical application of the knowledge you already have." Watching the dissections did not bother her. "It's not that graphic or gross," Bridget said. "We had gone before and saw a human (body) dissection. That was sort of interesting." Senior Beth Eggleston found the dissection of a human brain interesting, as were the dissections of the shoulder and knee joints. "I learned how the doctor could tell arthritic problems in the shoulder and knee joints and how he could point out that arthritis was starting here and there," Beth said. Beth said students learned how doctors deal with losing a patient. …