New Travel Magazine Targets Young Adults

Article excerpt

Twentysomething consumers live in a world that can't stop offering them new soft drinks, athletic shoes, and even television sitcoms.

Now they've got their own travel magazine. Launched in July, Blue is an action-adventure magazine for young travelers, a cross between National Geographic and Spin. Its premiere issue takes readers surfing in Bali, snowboarding in Alaska, and on a reindeer safari in Norway with New York author Tama Janowitz.

The magazine's young founder, Amy Schrier, published the first issue from her fourth-story walk-up in Manhattan's Greenwich Village. Ms. Schrier says she founded Blue because readers in their twenties find existing travel magazines "distant and academic." "Blue is not about taking a five-day Club Med cruise with meals at assigned times. Our aim is to translate the excitement of the globe to the printed page, whether it's mountain biking across Vietnam or white-water rafting in West Virginia," she says. Part of Blue's identity is its social agenda. Its first issue chronicles development threats to Hawaiian beaches. Another article profiles a group whose aims include freeing Tibet from Chinese repression and challenging unfair labor practices. One of Blue's standing features is "Urban Access," a compendium of one-, three-, and five-hour adventures in American cities such as Los Angeles, New York, Seattle, and Chicago. See Brooklyn by horseback or ride the waves breaking on a secluded beach along Lake Michigan. The transcendent cover of the bimonthly's first issue - a faceless youth diving into the unknown - hints at the nonlinear flow of its contents. No two pages look alike, thanks to designer David Carson, an ex-professional surfer and former designer of Raygun magazine. While striking, the magazine's zero-gravity, Mondrian layout makes its narrative tricky to follow. Attempting to clinch a share of the outdoor/adventure market will be a leap into the unknown. …