Lawyer-Judge Interchange Advocated by Lambird

Article excerpt

Restoring a more collegial atmosphere in the bustling world of litigation is a goal of Oklahoma City attorney Mona Salyer Lambird as 1990 president of the Oklahoma County Bar Association.

To accomplish her goal, she intends to develop ways to encourage increasing interchange between lawyers and judges, who too often isolate themselves from each other.

Lambird, first woman elected president of the association Monday, will begin serving her term as president elect in September and become president in September 1990. She is in her 18th year of practice at the Oklahoma City law firm Andrews Davis Leggs Bixler Milsten & Price.

"The pace of litigation, the increase in the number of lawyers and emphasis on the business end of legal practice places less priority on ethical, civil and collegial aspects of the profession, which both better serve the public and professionals," she said.

"It's easy to get bulldog-like in the heat of advocacy."

Much of the problem stems from the immense pressures placed on lawyers by the soaring cost of litigation, the numbers of lawyers flooding the profession and increased likelihood of malpractice, she said.

Lambird has developed a preference for an advocacy style based on excellent preparation, a grasp of the facts and common sense knowledge.

"Anger is usually a disguise for adequate preparation," she said.

The art of advocacy, Lambird said, takes skill in fashioning law so it's understandable and persuasive.

Lambird hopes to borrow educational ideas from the 50-member American Inn of Court XXIII of Oklahoma City to which she belongs, to broaden the association's contribution to legal education. Founded four years ago, the organization borrows educational concepts from the British Inns of the Court tradition, which aims to create constructive dialog between lawyers and judges.

Lambird, who specializes in employment law, considers the creation of uniform employment law a priority. …