Whinery Recipient of Teaching Excellence Award

Article excerpt

The 1991 recipient of the National Judicial College Erwin N. Griswold Award for Teaching Excellence is Leo H. Whinery, the Alfred P. Murrah Professor of Law at the University of Oklahoma.

The national award is the highest honor bestowed by the National Judicial College, which is located on the campus of the University of Nevada, Reno, and is the principal agency for providing continuing legal education for trial judges in the United States. The award is named for the long-time dean of the Harvard Law School and former solicitor general of the United States.

The award recognizes Whinery's "outstanding contributions to judicial education in the United States," said V. Robert Payant, dean of College of Law at the University of Nevada, in making its presentation.

Past recipients of the Griswold award include Chief Justice (Ret.) William Grimes of New Hampshire, Justice Joseph R. Weisberger of Rhode Island and Judge Arthur R. Gladstone of Washington, D.C.

Whinery, a former municipal criminal court judge in Norman, has been an active volunteer member of the National Judicial College faculty for 19 years. The judicial college's law faculty is comprised of outstanding judges, lawyers and law professors from throughout the nation who contribute their time and talents without compensation.

Whinery has served as chairman for the curriculum evaluation committee, which conducted the first major evaluation of the National Judicial College curriculum. He also was faculty coordinator of the college's advanced evidence course and chairman of the faculty council.

He has been a member of the law faculty at Oklahoma University since 1959 and is recognized as an expert on the Oklahoma law of evidence. He is the author of numerous publications on evidence, including the first of two volumes on "Oklahoma Evidence: A Guide to the Oklahoma Evidence Code." He also lectures widely throughout the country on evidence law. . .

A pre-law information seminar for minority students titled "Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Law School" is planned next Saturday and Sunday on the University of Oklahoma Norman campus.

Highlighting the two-day seminar will be a panel discussion by minority attorneys and judges and a keynote address by Bill Piatt Jr., professor of law at Texas Tech University. Participants also will have an opportunity to attend a law school class and a moot court demonstration.

The seminar is scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. Saturday in the OU Law Center, 300 Timberdell Road. Students will have the opportunity to take a law school admissions practice exam, attend a lunch and an informal discussion with OU law students, and watch a demonstration of a moot court argument. An afternoon session will be offered on the admissions process and financial

Concluding Saturday's events will be a banquet and keynote address by Piatt in the Oklahoma Memorial Union, 900 Asp Ave.

Students will receive tips on preparing for the Law School Admissions Test and will have an opportunity to attend a typical law class taught by an OU law professor on Sunday. "The Role of Minority Lawyers" will be the focus of a panel discussion led by minority lawyers and judges.

Piatt earned his bachelor's degree in psychology and political science from Eastern New Mexico University in 1972 and his law degree from the University of New Mexico in 1975. Piatt also has served as assistant public defender and assistant attorney general for the state of New Mexico. He has written extensively on human rights, law and language.

Cost of the seminar is $15, which includes lodging for two nights, one lunch and a Saturday evening banquet. To make reservations contact Deborah Case, minority recruiting coordinator, at the OU College of Law. . .

An interdisciplinary study of the U.S. Constitution and its interpretation in Supreme Court opinions has been published by the University of Oklahoma Press. …