Biographical Dictionary of American Educators - Vol. 3

By John F. Ohles | Go to book overview

Tyler was appointed professor of Latin and Greek at Amherst College, remaining an active instructor of classics there until 1892. Throughout his teaching career he preached in several area churches. He played a major role in founding Williston Seminary in Easthampton, Massachusetts.

Tyler was the author of Germania and Agricola of Tacitus ( 1847), Histories of Tacitus ( 1848), Prayer for Colleges ( 1854), Plato's Apology and Crito ( 1859), Memoir of Dr. Henry Lobdell ( 1859), Theology of the Greek Poets ( 1867), Plutarch on the Delay of the Diety (with H. B. Hackett , 1867), History of Amherst College ( 1873), and Demosthenes's Phillippics and Olynthiacs ( 1875). Tyler's autobiography was published posthumously in 1912.

He served on the board of trustees of Williston Academy (president), Mount Holyoke Seminary, and Smith College. He received two honorary degrees from Harvard University and one from Amherst College.

REFERENCES: AC; DAB; NCAB ( 10:347), NYT, November 20, 1897, p. 7; WWW (H). Joseph M. McCarthy


U

ULICH, Robert. B. April 20, 1890, Lam bei Riedermühl, Bavaria, Germany, to Robert and Helene (Schaarschmidt) Ulich. M. November 16, 1929, to Elsa Braedstroem. M. December 30, 1948, to Mary Ewen. Ch. two. D. June 17, 1977, Stuttgart, Germany.

Robert Ulich attended the Humanistisches Gymnasium ( 1900-09) where he received a thorough preparation in Latin and Greek. After studying in Germany at the universities of Bremen, Munich, and Berlin, and at Neuchâtel, Switzerland, he received the Ph.D. degree ( 1915) from the University of Leipzig, Germany.

Ulich was a research and teaching assistant in the history of culture at the University of Leipzig and teacher of German literature at the Thomas Gymnasium in Leipzig. In 1918 he became a librarian at the University of Leipzig. He moved to the Ministry of Education of Saxony in 1921 where he served as assistant counselor in charge of the division of adult education ( 1921-23) and was counselor in charge of Saxon University ( 1923-33). He was also honorary professor of philosophy at the Dresden Institute of Technology ( 1928-33).

When Adolf Hitler and the National Socialist party came to power in 1933 Ulich, who opposed Nazi policy, left Germany. Arriving in the United States in 1934 he joined the faculty of Harvard University as a lecturer in

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Biographical Dictionary of American Educators - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Biographical Dictionary of American Educators 1069
  • R 1071
  • S 1135
  • T 1264
  • T 1318
  • T 1319
  • T 1332
  • T 1456
  • Appendix A - Place of Birth 1461
  • Appendix B - State of Major Service 1500
  • Appendix C - Field of Work 1521
  • Appendix D - Chronology of Birth Years 1546
  • Appendix - Important Dates in American Education 1569
  • Index 1573
  • About the Editor 1667
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