Biographical Dictionary of American Educators - Vol. 3

By John F. Ohles | Go to book overview

YOUNG, John Wesley. B. November 17, 1879, Columbus, Ohio, to William Henry and Marie Louise (Widenhorn) Young. M. July 20, 1907, to Mary Louise Aston. Ch. one. D. February 17, 1932, Hanover, New Hampshire.

John Wesley Young grew up in Ohio and Germany where his father was United States consul in Karlsruhe. He was graduated from the gymnasium in Baden-Baden, Germany ( 1895), and Ohio State University, from which he received the Ph.B. degree ( 1899). He received the A.M. ( 1901) and Ph.D. ( 1904) degrees from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

Young taught mathematics at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois ( 1903-05), Princeton University ( 1905-08), and the University of Illinois ( 1908-10). He was head of the mathematics department at the University of Kansas ( 1910-11) and professor of mathematics at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, from 1911 to his death. He modernized the teaching of mathematics at Dartmouth and was a leading mathematics educator.

Chief examiner in geometry for the College Entrance Examination Board ( 1915-17), Young wrote books that influenced the content and method of mathematical instruction, including Projective Geometry (two volumes, with Oswald Veblen, q.v., 1910-18), Lectures on Fundamental Concepts of Algebra and Geometry ( 1911), Plane Geometry (with A. S. Schwartz , 1915), Elementary Mathematical Analysis (with F. M. Morgan, 1917), Plane Trigonometry (with F. M. Morgan, 1919), and Projective Geometry ( 1929). He was editor of Mathematics Teacher, Bulletin ( 1907- 25) and Colloquium Publications of the American Mathematical Society and of Carus Mathematical Monographs.

Young was a member of many mathematic societies. He helped found the Mathematical Association of America (vice-president, 1918, and president, 1929-31). He was active in the American Mathematical Society (council member, 1907-25 and vice-president, 1928-30). He was chairman of the Committee on College Requirements in Mathematics ( 1916-24) and edited the committee report, The Reorganization of Mathematics in Secondary Education ( 1923).


Z

REFERENCES: DAB; DSB; NCAB ( 23:279); WWW ( I); V. Sanford, "John Wesley Young," Mathematics Teacher 25 ( April 1932): 232-34.

Robert McGinty

ZACHOS, John Celivergos. B. December 20, 1820, Constantinople, Turkey, to Nicholas and Euphrosyne Zachos. M. July 26, 1849, to Harriet Tomkins Canfield. Ch. six. D. March 20, 1898, New York, New York.

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Biographical Dictionary of American Educators - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Biographical Dictionary of American Educators 1069
  • R 1071
  • S 1135
  • T 1264
  • T 1318
  • T 1319
  • T 1332
  • T 1456
  • Appendix A - Place of Birth 1461
  • Appendix B - State of Major Service 1500
  • Appendix C - Field of Work 1521
  • Appendix D - Chronology of Birth Years 1546
  • Appendix - Important Dates in American Education 1569
  • Index 1573
  • About the Editor 1667
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