The Letters of Jonathan Swift to Charles Ford

By David Nichol Smith | Go to book overview

THE LETTERS OF JONATHAN SWIFT TO CHARLES FORD

Edited by DAVID NICHOL SMITH Merton Professor of English Literature in the University of Oxford

OXFORD AT THE CLARENDON PRESS 1935

-iii-

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The Letters of Jonathan Swift to Charles Ford
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • The Contents v
  • I 1
  • II 3
  • III 6
  • IV 11
  • V 11
  • VI 14
  • VII 15
  • VIII 16
  • VIII 17
  • VIII 21
  • XII 24
  • XIII 25
  • XIV 27
  • XV 29
  • XVI 31
  • XVI 33
  • XVIII 36
  • XIX 37
  • XX 39
  • XXI 43
  • XXII 45
  • XXIII 49
  • XXIV 52
  • XXV 54
  • XXV 56
  • XXVII 60
  • XXVIII 62
  • XXX 66
  • XXXI 67
  • XXXV 81
  • XXXVI 85
  • XXXVII 88
  • XXXVIII 89
  • XXXIX 93
  • XL 95
  • XL 98
  • XLIII 102
  • XLIV 105
  • XLV 109
  • XLVI 111
  • XLVI 115
  • XLVI 118
  • L 119
  • LI 120
  • LI 123
  • LI 126
  • LIV 127
  • LVI 132
  • LVII 135
  • LVIII 139
  • LIX 142
  • LIX 147
  • LIX 150
  • LIX 152
  • LIX 155
  • LXVI 164
  • LXVII 167
  • LXVIII 171
  • LXIX 173
  • Poems among Ford's Papers and a Fragment of a Pamphlet 177
  • Letters to Ford from Gay 221
  • Letters to Ford from Pope and Parnell 225
  • Letters to Ford from Bolingbroke 231
  • Letters from the Duchess of Ormond to Ford 241
  • Index 243
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