History of England: From the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth - Vol. 6

By James Anthony Froude | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXIII.
THE MARTYRS.

THE protests of Renard against the persecution received no attention.

The inquidtion established by the legate was not to commence till Easter; but the prisons were already abundantly supplied with persons who had been arrested on various pretexts, and the material was ready in hand to occupy the interval. The four persons who had first suffered had been conspicuous among the leaders of the Reformation; but the bishops were for the most part prudent in their selection of victims, and chose them principally from among the poor and unfriended.

On the 9th of February, a weaver named Tomkins (the man who had held his hand in the candle), Pigot, a butcher, Knight, a barber, Hunter, an apprentice boy of 19, Lawrence, a priest, and Hawkes, a gentleman, were brought before Bonner in the Consistory at St. Paul's, where they were charged with denying transubstantiation, and were condemned to die. The indignation which had been excited by the first executions caused a delay in carrying the sentence into effect; but as the menace of insurrection died away the wolves came back to their prey. On the 9th of March, two more were condemned also, Thomas Causton and

The persecution continues.

March Eight more persons are

-314-

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History of England: From the Fall of Wolsey to the Death of Elizabeth - Vol. 6
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents of Volume VI v
  • Chapter XXX - Queen Jane and Queen Mary 15
  • Chapter XXXI - The Spanish Marriage 132
  • Chapter XXXII - Reconciliation with Rome 233
  • Chapter XXXIII - The Martyrs 314
  • Chapter XXXIV - Calais 403
  • Chapter XXXV - Death of Mary 472
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