The Desert of the Exodus: Journeys on Foot in the Wilderness of the Forty Years' Wanderings; Undertaken in Connection with the Ordnance Survey of Sinai and the Palestine Exploration Fund

By E. H. Palmer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII.
THE NEIGHBORHOOD OF JEBEL Músa.

Rocks with Legends. Wády T'láh. Bedawín Camp. Storms. A Disaster. Collection of Arab Stories. Doctoring the Bedawín. Ascent of Jebel Katarína. The Partridge Fountain. View from the Summit. 'Abbás Pasha's Palace. Jebel Moneijáh. Excursion to Jebel Hadíd. Primeval Stone Remains. Maghrabí Treasure-finders. Wády Nasb. Christmas at Sinai.

OUR camp was stationed in the convent valley for nearly two months, so that we had ample opportunities for making ourselves acquainted with the various objects of interest, traditional and natural, in which the neighborhood abounds. On the projecting spur of the mountain immediately above our tents was the burial-ground of Sheik Nahámeh, to whose tomb the sick or decrepit among the Arabs resort in great numbers and offer sacrifices; they believe that in life he was a physician, and that he still has the power of healing their various disorders if properly propitiated with blood. A little farther on is a large rock dotted all over with white marks, and looking as though it might have served as a target for rifle practice; it is in reality used by the Arabs as a standard for measuring their height; whence its name, "the Measuring Stone." In addition to the monkish traditions mentioned in the last chapter, the valleys around Jebel Músa contain several spots to which native legendary interest attaches. In Wády ed Deir, on the right-hand side, and not far from Aaron's Hill, there is a small boulder covered with "cupmarkings," such as Scotch antiquaries are familiar with, and which also bears an indentation, the impression, it is said, of Moses's back. "Look," said an Arab to me as I was regarding it one day with curiosity, "look how the

-107-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Desert of the Exodus: Journeys on Foot in the Wilderness of the Forty Years' Wanderings; Undertaken in Connection with the Ordnance Survey of Sinai and the Palestine Exploration Fund
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 470

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.