The Desert of the Exodus: Journeys on Foot in the Wilderness of the Forty Years' Wanderings; Undertaken in Connection with the Ordnance Survey of Sinai and the Palestine Exploration Fund

By E. H. Palmer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII.
THE HIGHWAYS AND BY-WAYS OF SINAI.

Return to Mukatteb and Maghárah. — Wády Sidreh. — Sarábít el Khádim. — Egyptian Remains. — Their Origin and Purport. — Mines. — Wády Nasb. — Wády Ba'ba. — Plague of Insects. — Plain of El Markhd. — Abu Zenfmeh. — Wády Taiyebeh. — Encampment by the Red Sea. — Wádies Ethál and Useit. — Hammám Far'ún. — Hot Springs. — Legend of Pharaoh's Bath. — A Hurricane. — Jebel Músa again.

A FEW days sufficed us to rest and "post up" our back work, after which we again got into marching order and resumed our wanderings in the highways and by-ways of the Peninsula. We first of all proceeded to pay another visit to Wády Mukatteb, taking with us Sergeant. Macdonald, the photographer of the Expedition, and obtained some excellent photographs of the inscriptions and of the neighboring mines in Wády Igné. As our journey thus far lay unavoidably over the same ground which we had before traveled, there was little or nothing left to note or remark upon our way. Hence we struck up Wády Sidreh, a narrow valley falling into Mukatteb on the right, intending to cross over into Sarábít el Khádim. This valley, which had never before been explored, winds up into the mountains for about two hours, and after this turns off into a broad open wády, called Umm Ajráf, which is again joined by Wády Khamíleh, on the road from Suez to Jebel Músa. From this place to Sarábít our path lay over the same piece of road as that which we had traveled on our first entry into the country — namely, over the rough pass of Súwig to the mouth of Wády Sarábít itself, where we encamped as near as possible to the foot of the mountain. Although only seven hundred feet in height, the ascent of Sarábít el Khádim is by no means easy. A scramble over a rough slide of loose sandstone at the up

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