Ancient Greece: A Sketch of Its Art, Literature & Philosophy Viewed in Connexion with Its External History from Earliest Times to the Age of Alexander the Great

By H. B. Cotterill | Go to book overview

PREFACE

WHEN the attempt is made in a book of this size to give a continuous account of the external history of Greece, and into this framework to fit a number of sketches descriptive of its art, literature, and philosophy, as well as other matters, it is of course necessary to omit many details and to rely on whatever skill one may happen to possess in selection and combination. In regard to antiquities and literature, I have drawn attention chiefly to what is extant and of general interest, and have trusted to description, illustration, and quotation rather than to disquisition and criticism. The Sections appended to each chapter treat subjects that are closely connected with the period covered by the chapter. Any of these Sections can be omitted without seriously interrupting continuity. Temples, Dress, Coins, and Vases have been relegated to Notes at the end of the volume, seeing that they are not specially connected with any one period.

The letters B.C. (but not A.D.) have been generally omitted, as unnecessary in a book on Ancient Greece.

To name in full all the books that one has to use in such work is unnecessary, but, since space did not always allow of exact reference on occasions when I annexed a fact or a sentiment, it is right that I should here acknowledge my obligations to the following modern writers: Baikie, Bérard, Bergk, Bernoulli, Buchholz, Burrows, Bury, Busolt, Butcher, Archer Butler, Chamberlain (Grundlagen), Christ, Dawkins, Deussen, Diehl, Donaldson, Dörpfeld, Dussaud, Sir A. J. Evans, Frazer (Pausanias), Furtwängler, E. Gardner, P. Gardner, Gomperz, Grote, Hall, Miss Harrison, Head, Hill, Hogarth, Holm,

-v-

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