Ancient Greece: A Sketch of Its Art, Literature & Philosophy Viewed in Connexion with Its External History from Earliest Times to the Age of Alexander the Great

By H. B. Cotterill | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
THE RISE OF MACEDONIA : PHILIP AND ALEXANDER

(TO 334)

SECTIONS: ISOCRATES, AESCHINES, DEMOSTHENES, LATER PHILOSOPHERS : LYSIPPUS, HELLENISTIC SCULPTURE

WE have seen how after Mantineia the Theban supremacy rapidly declined, and how Athens once more began to build up an oversea empire. In this she might have been successful had it not been for the rise of two semi-Hellenic powers, Caria and Macedonia. Whether she would have held her own against the maritime expansion of Caria, which under Mausolus seems to have been very remarkable, it is idle to speculate, for both she and her rival were swallowed up by Macedonia, and it is a question of more practical import whether an united Greece (if such a thing is conceivable) might not have succeeded in resisting the Macedonian conqueror, against whom the miserable feuds that for seventy years had drained, and were still draining, her life-blood now left her powerless.1

When Thebes was at the height of her power Pelopidas had brought even Macedonia under Theban influence, if not under Theban dominion, and to assure the fidelity of the Macedonian ruler (at that time a usurper, Ptolemy Alorites) he had sent as a hostage to Thebes the young Macedonian prince, Philip, afterwards the victor at Chaeroneia and the father of Alexander the Great.

Until this time neither Macedonia nor Thessaly had really

____________________
1
Of course another view can be taken. One may regard Macedonia as a Hellenic state and Philip and Alexander as the beneficent founders of a vast Hellenic Empire in which the petty squabbles of the Greek cities found peace as brawling streams when they reach the sea, to use a Dantesque simile.

-422-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ancient Greece: A Sketch of Its Art, Literature & Philosophy Viewed in Connexion with Its External History from Earliest Times to the Age of Alexander the Great
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 504

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.