Ancient Greece: A Sketch of Its Art, Literature & Philosophy Viewed in Connexion with Its External History from Earliest Times to the Age of Alexander the Great

By H. B. Cotterill | Go to book overview

NOTE A
GREEK TEMPLES

IN order to avoid the distraction that would be caused by frequently interrupting the narrative, or by dealing with the subject in several widely separated Sections, I have relegated to this Note a few details concerning the chief Greek temples of different ages. The chronology is, of course, not always certain. The Index and List of Illustrations should be consulted. Pictures are given of thirteen of these temples.

(1) The Heraion (Temple of Hera), at Olympia. Doric: 6 × 16. Built perhaps c. 900. The stone foundations (probably the most ancient relic of a Greek temple extant) were originally surmounted by walls of sunburnt brick and wooden pillars. Stone columns were gradually substituted, which accounts for the fact that, to judge from the remains of thirty-six of the columns and of twenty capitals, they were almost all different. Pausanias saw one old wooden pillar still remaining. Nothing has been found of an entablature, frieze, &c. The Hermes of Praxiteles was found in this temple, buried in the clay of the sunburnt bricks.

(2) Temple of Apollo, Corinth. Doric: 6 × 15. Probably built by Periander, c. 600. Seven monolith columns of rough limestone, originally overlaid with yellowish stucco, still stand and bear a part of the architrave. They are finely profiled, with a noticeable entasis, but are shorter than usual in proportion to the thickness, the height (23 1/2 feet)being only 7 2/3 modules (semi-diameters), and the capitals are remarkably massive.

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