Austria-Hungary: Including Dalmatia and Bosnia; Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

currant, 'Weinseharl', barberry, 'Dindl', cherry, 'Marillen', apricot, 'Schmankerl', vanilla-ice).


VI. Post and Telegraph Oifices.

POSTAL RATES. Austria, Hungary, and Bositia each have postage- stamps of their own. Ordinary Letters within Austria - Hungary, Bosnia, and Germany, 10 h. per 20 grammes (2/3 oz.). for foreign countries, 25 h. per 15 grammes oz.). Registered Letters 25 h. more. Post Cards 5 h., for abroad 10 h. ; reply post-cards 10 and 20 h. Letter Cards 6 h. (for correspondence within any one town), 10 h., and 20 h.Stamps may be purchased at most tobacco-shops. Foreigners should be careful not to put Austrian stamps on letters mailed in Hungary, or vice versa.

TELEGRAMS. The charge for a telegram within Austria-Hungary, Bosnia, and Germany is 6 h. per word (minimum 60 h.). For each foreign telegram a charge of 60 h. is made plus the following rates per word: Great Britain and Ireland 26 h.; Belgium or Denmark 21 h.; France or Bulgaria 16 h.; Italy 8-16 h.; Montenegro, Roumania, Servia, or Switzerland 9 h.; Netherlands 19 h.; Norway 32 h.; Russia or Sweden 24 h.; Turkey 28 h.


Abbreviations.
R. = Room; also Route. N. = North, northern, etc.
B. = Breakfast. S. = South, etc.
D. = Dinner. E. = East, etc.
A. = Attendance. W. = West, etc.
L. = Light.K. = Krone (crown).
pens. = pension.h. = heller.
rfmts. = refreshments.M = mark.
M. = English mile. pf. = pfennig.
R., r., L., 1. = right, left. hr. = hour.
omn. = omnibus. min. = minute.
ft. = English foot. ca. = circa, about.

The number prefixed to the name of a place on a railway or highroad indicates its distance in English miles from the starting-point of the route or sub-route. The number of feet given after the name of a place shows its height above the sea-level. The letter d, with a date, after the name of a person, indicates the year of his death.

Asterisks are used as marks of commendation.

-xviii-

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