Austria-Hungary: Including Dalmatia and Bosnia; Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

VII. DALMATIA.
52.From (Trieste) Pola or Fiume to Spalato by Sea . . .293
From Zara to Knin. The Kerka Falls and Seardona. From
Sebenico to Knin
, 296.
53.Spalato and Environs297
Traù , 300. — Salona, Clissa, and the Source of he Jader ,
300-302. — From Spalato to Almissa by land , 302.
54.From Spalato to Cattaro. The S. Dalmatian Islands302
Cetina Waterfalls , 302. — Cittavecchia , 304. — Island of
Busi
, 305. — Lacroma. San Biagio , 307. — Valley of the
Ombla; Cannosa. From Gravosa to Zelenika
, 308. —
From Cattaro to Corfiù , 311.
55.Excursion to Montenegro311

The kingdom of Dalmatia, the southernmost crown-land of the Austria-Hungarian Monarchy, belonging to Cis-Leithania, extends from the Quarnerolo on the N. to the hills on the Lake of Scutari on the S., while on the E. it is commanded by the Velebit Mts., the Dinarian Alps, and the mountainous region of the Herzegovina and of Montenegro. The W. side of Dalmatia is washed by the Adriatic, the Seno Adriático of mariners, which from time immemorial has been the highway of traffic between East and West. Coasting vessels usually steer within the belt of islands which protect the Dalmatian coast, while the opposite Italian coast is almost entirely destitute of such shelter. The tide within these islands rises to the unusual height of six feet. A constant current flows from Corfù to Venice, causing in stormy weather the dangerous tides of the Quarnero.

Covering an area of a little over 5000 sq. M., Dalmatia forms the N.W. fringe of the Balkan peninsula, and consists of a coast deeply indented with numerous bays and fjords, the entrances to which are guarded by innumerable islands and reefs (scogli), while the mainland is a mountainous region, culminating in the Velebit Mts. (5770 ft.) and the Orjen near Cattaro (6218 ft.), and forming a lofty plateau descending abruptly to the sea, with crests running almost exclusively from N.W. to S.E., parallel with the Dinarian Alps. The islands and peninsulas which have been formed by subsidence of portions of the land also run in the same direction, except the southern islands of Brazza, Lesina, and Curzola, which lie from W. to E. The Dalmatians usually speak of east and west only, ignoring the other points of the compass, the former being suso or levante ('up'), the latter giù or ponente ('down'). The bleak and sterile mountain-region is badly watered, being intersected, in its length of 370 M., by only four rivers worthy of mention ( Zermagna, Kerka, Cetina, Narenta), which are torrents in their upper parts and

-289-

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Austria-Hungary: Including Dalmatia and Bosnia; Handbook for Travellers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Money-Table ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Maps x
  • Introduction xi
  • Abbreviations xviii
  • I - Vienna and Its Environs 1
  • Contents 1
  • II - Upper and Lower Austria, Salzkammergut, and Salzburg 83
  • Contents 83
  • III - Tyrol.. 127
  • Contents 127
  • IV - Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, and Istria 173
  • Contents 173
  • V - Bohemia and Moravia 215
  • Contents 215
  • VI - Galicia and the Bukowina 275
  • Contents 275
  • VII - Dalmatia 289
  • Contents 289
  • VIII - Hungary, Croatia, and Slavonia 317
  • Contents 317
  • IX - Transylvania 401
  • Contents 401
  • X - Bosnia and the Herzegovina 427
  • Contents 427
  • Index 443
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