Austria-Hungary: Including Dalmatia and Bosnia; Handbook for Travellers

By Karl Baedeker | Go to book overview

IX. TRANSYLVANIA.
78. From Klausenburg to Bistritz405
From Deés to Nagybánya, 406. — From Sajó-Magyarós to
Maros-Ludas. From Bistritz to Alt-Rodna, 407.
79. From Klausenburg to Hermannstadt and Kronstadt407
From Torda to Topánfalva and Toroczkó. From Kocsárd
to Szász-Régen. From Szász-Régen to Bistritz and to Borszék,
408. — From Schässburg to Csik-Szereda viâ Szekely-Ud-
varhély, 410. — From Reps to Fogaras, 411.
80. Kronstadt and Environs411
From Kronstadt to Hosszufalu and to Zernest. Mountain
Ascents, 413, 414. — From Kronstadt to Kézdi-Vásárhely.
From Sepsi-Szent-György to Borszék, 415.
81. From Arad to Hermannstadt415
From Piski to Vajda-Hunyad; to Petrosény and Lupény,
416. — From Petrosény to Hermannstadt, 417. — From
Karlsburg to Abrudbánya, 419.
From Alvincz to Hermannstadt
419
82. Hermannstadt and Environs419
Hohe Rinne, 421.
83. From Hermannstadt to Fogaras421
Heltau; Michelsberg, 421. — Rotenturm Pass; Surul; Negoi,
422. — Bullea Valley. Podragu. From Fogaras to Kron-
stadt, 423.
84. From Kronstadt to Bucharest viâ Predeal423
From Predeal to Rosenau, 424. — From Bucharest to
Giurgevo, 426.

The former principality of Transylvania, called Erdély by the Magyars, and Ardealu by the Roumanians (both meaning 'forest- land'), a mountainous district of about 21,000 sq. M. in extent, with 2,456,000 inhab., forms the S.E. part of Hungary (15 counties). Its German name of Siebenbürgen has been derived from the first seven 'burgs', or fortresses, built by the German colonists, or from the seven once fortified towns of Hermannstadt, Klausenburg, Kronstadt, Bistritz, Medias, Mühlenbach, and Schässburg.

History. At the beginning of the Christian era the district now known as Transylvania formed part of the kingdom of Dacia, and in 105 A.D., on the subjugation by Trajan of Decebalus, the last Dacian sovereign, it was incorporated with the Roman province of Dacia. It remained under Roman sway till 274 A. D., when the Emperor Aurelian was compelled to withdraw his troops and the flower of the Roman colonists across the Danube by the Gothic hordes from the N., which now poured into the country. From this date down to the beginning of the 12th cent. Transylvania was the great theatre of battles between the Ostrogoths, Huns, Longobards, Bulgarians, Magyars, Kumans, and other Eastern races

-401-

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Austria-Hungary: Including Dalmatia and Bosnia; Handbook for Travellers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Money-Table ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Maps x
  • Introduction xi
  • Abbreviations xviii
  • I - Vienna and Its Environs 1
  • Contents 1
  • II - Upper and Lower Austria, Salzkammergut, and Salzburg 83
  • Contents 83
  • III - Tyrol.. 127
  • Contents 127
  • IV - Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, and Istria 173
  • Contents 173
  • V - Bohemia and Moravia 215
  • Contents 215
  • VI - Galicia and the Bukowina 275
  • Contents 275
  • VII - Dalmatia 289
  • Contents 289
  • VIII - Hungary, Croatia, and Slavonia 317
  • Contents 317
  • IX - Transylvania 401
  • Contents 401
  • X - Bosnia and the Herzegovina 427
  • Contents 427
  • Index 443
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