Benjamin Franklin as a Scientist

BY
ROBERT A. MILLIKAN, Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Director, Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics, California Institute of Technology.

Benjamin Franklin is perhaps the only American in that relatively small group of men of any time or country who, without having been either the head of a state or a military hero, have yet gained so conspicuous a place in history that their names and sayings are known the world over. Although he lived two hundred years ago in what was then a remote corner of the earth, far from any of the centers of world influence, yet his name and traits are still so widely known that the following incident could happen. Of what other American names, save possibly those of Washington and Lincoln, could anything like this be said? Franklin would have found it as interesting and amusing as will this audience.

One evening about two and a half months ago I was being shown by a devout Brahmin through the great Hindu temple at Madura in Southern India. There were many hundreds of Indians wandering about through the scores of rooms in the huge structure. Occasionally one of them would fall prostrate on his face before the image of the elephant god or the monkey god, or one or another of the multitudinous forms assumed by Krishna or Siva or their wives. In one of the rooms an expounder of the Yogi philosophy was passing around a printed page of directions for "the Yogi way of life" to a score or more of pupils. As I was looking on in the back of the room he approached and put one of the sheets into my hand. I glanced through it and saw that it was in English and consisted merely in a set of rules for physical exercise (mystically interpreted, however), for eating and sleeping and early rising, etc., etc. As I glanced down the page I read the injunction, "You are to spend some time each day, morning and evening, in reflection, as Benjamin Franklin did."

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Meet Dr. Franklin
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.