Molding the Constitution

BY
GEORGE WHARTON PEPPER, ESQ.

It is timely, I think, to drive home the point that it was what Franklin is that enabled him to accomplish what he did rather than the specific proposals which he made or the instrumentalities which he employed to attain his ends. Franklin, as I understand him, is Personality in Action; and personality, I take it, is the secret of all real influence.

In this respect Franklin does not stand alone. There are at least two other great men to keep him company. It seems to me that the greatest contribution to history made by Washington, Lincoln and Franklin was the contribution of themselves. Other statesmen have accomplished equally great results by diplomacy, by eloquence, by liberal promises, by a thousand devices for securing popular support; but these men when their country's line was wavering brought up reserves of character, threw them into the breach, repelled the assault and turned defeat into victory.

It is difficult to exaggerate the importance of the point just made. We become so accustomed to measuring public men by what they say and the way they say it that we forget to study the man behind the words to determine whether he is steadfast, unselfish and humble. Kipling's poem "If--" gives the specifications for the character of a real man; and there is good reason to believe that it was Washington's character that inspired the poem. The figure of Lincoln as it emerges from Sandburg's volumes is the figure of a man so steadfast, so selfless and so humble that you realize (perhaps for the first time) that in the inspired lines of the Second Inaugural you have the unconscious self-portrait of a man of God.

As I study Franklin's life the significance of his personality impresses me more and more. You may make a catalogue of all his inventions, a compilation of all his writings and a list of all his wise and witty sayings and you will scarcely

-105-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Meet Dr. Franklin
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.