Mambo Montage: The Latinization of New York

By Agustín Laó-Montes; Arlene Dávila | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
Life Off the Hyphen
Latino Literature and Nuyorican Traditions
Juan Flores

THE VIEW FROM THE HYPHEN

In 1990 literary history was made when for the first time a book by a Hispanic writer won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, generally considered the most prestigious honor in American literature. The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love, the second novel by Cuban-American author Oscar Hijuelos, tells the story of two musician brothers, Cesar and Nestor Castillo, who arrive from Cuba in 1949 to try their luck on the New York music scene. Though not an untroubled immigrant success story, the Castillo brothers do get their piece of the American Dream when in 1955 they appear in a scene of the I Love Lucy show. The book's success, however, was boundless, having been helped along by what has been called “the most highly promoted Hispanic book in history by a major press.” 1 Before culminating in the Pulitzer, recognition gathered in approving reviews, extensive exposure, advance sales of foreign rights, and a movie deal. By 1990 the time was right for a Hispanic Pulitzer, and when Mambo Kings rose to the top the door was thrown open for the entry of “Latino literature” onto the landscape of mainstream American letters.

The accolades were not at all unanimous, however, even among Latinos, many of whom believe that the book (and its insidious movie version) only repeat and reinforce some of the most nagging stereotypes of Latinos. Besides, the touted Pulitzer has never been regarded as a sure stamp of literary quality, many past awards having gone to books that were quickly forgotten and subject to more qualified reviews once they were read more closely. The Pulitzer board and juries, responsible for finalizing decisions

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mambo Montage: The Latinization of New York
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 493

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.