Understanding the Placebo Effect in Complementary Medicine: Theory, Practice, and Research

By David Peters | Go to book overview
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9
Placebo responses in bodywork *
Phil Latey
The placebo response in bodywork
Placebo responsiveness: patient factors
Persuasion
Animal hypnosis: a model of non‐ verbal persuasion for bodyworkers?
Limiting persuasion
Working with longer prognoses
Suggestibility
Degree of difficulty
Phased patterns: the transition from persuasion to rapport
Interpersonal and 'physical' rapport
Practitioners and their feelings
Structural coupling and intertransference
Intimacy in the therapeutic relationship
Conclusion

Editor's note

For many years I have admired Phil's ability to think about osteopathic body work. He has an extraordinary ability to notice aspects of the consultation that most of us miss; and also a way of confronting his fellow practitioners with their own unexamined beliefs and assumptions. Phil brings a psychotherapist's sensitivities to the bodywork session, where he sees two embodied minds at work, each one entwined with its individual family and cultural history. His chapter explores the non-specific effects involved in manual therapies with their positive and negative potential. Phil raises two particularly fascinating possibilities, concerning undeniably non‐ specific elements in the consultation that are also substantial and literally tangible: in fact both can only be known through touch. One is the ability of the skilled psychologically aware bodyworker to help people re-embody themselves. The other is the extraordinary notion that subtle but powerful therapeutic effects may involve a kind of body-to-body entrainment. This is an experience many bodyworkers as well as psychotherapists would attest to; a more concrete version of Bob Wither's ideas that containment can be enacted through the ceremonial of complementary therapy and that they can trigger healing responses. In this chapter Lately takes us to the mysterious leading edge of conscious bodywork.

____________________
*
This chapter is based on an article that first appeared in the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies (Latey P 2000 Placebo: a study of persuasion and rapport. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies 4(2): 123-136).

-147-

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