The Person as Patient: Psychosocial Perspectives for the Health Care Professional

By Elsa Ramsden | Go to book overview

Glossary of Terms

Accommodation — a process of modifying a mental scheme to account for new information taken in, that alters the dimensions of the scheme.

Adaptation — the ability of an organism to change or adjust in order to survive in its environment.

Amoral judgment — decision based on personal taste or temperament without right or wrong values, for example, preferences in food, use of leisure time.

Anxiety — a feeling of painful or apprehensive uneasiness of some unclear threat.

Apathy — absence of emotion; absence of interest and enthusiasm.

Assimilation — the integration of information into an evolving set of structures, of both biological and intellectual dimensions.

Attitude - a predisposition having emotional, belief, and behavioral components that determines a person's reaction toward a particular social stimulus.

Authoritarian — strict adherence to the rules.

Automatic behavior - well-practiced behavior that allows performance without conscious thought.

Autonomy — the ethical principle of the freedom to make a decision and choose a course of action, based upon the requirement of access to information in order to do so, and respect for the autonomy of others.

Belief - acceptance that something is true, though proof may be lacking.

Beneficence — the ethical principle to do good. Bioethics — a branch of philosophy devoted to the study of morality in the health care environment.

Casuistry — a method of ethical reasoning that derives ethical principles from a case study.

Classical conditioning - the association of two or more stimuli with a particular response.

Cognitive dissonance - incoming data triggers two or more cognitive maps with disparate meanings, both of which cannot be applied to the data.

Cognitive map - mental schema that organizes information and events around common themes and carries in them expectations and emotions.

Comorbidity — the presence of more than one disease process in an individual.

Compliance — the extent to which a person's behavior coincides with medical or health advice.

Concept - a label, an abstraction to classify a complex set of features in nature as well as empirical observations.

Conformist — one who adheres to standards of behavior and dress of a particular group.

Consciousness - a state of awareness in which we are cognizant of mental processes and can describe what is going on.

Construct — refers to something intangible, that which cannot be seen or felt.

Coping - dealing successfully with circumstances and managing to move on with life.

Crisis — a crucial point in the course of events. Culture — customs, beliefs, values, and norms for behavior shared in common by a group of people.

Debilitation - enfeeblement.

Deconditioning — the multiple changes that occur in organ systems that are induced by inactivity and restored by activity.

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The Person as Patient: Psychosocial Perspectives for the Health Care Professional
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Person as Patient - Psychosocial Perspectives for the Health Care Professional *
  • Contents *
  • Contributors *
  • Preface ix
  • Dedication xii
  • 1 - Of Systems and Theories i
  • 2 - A System of Ecology 10
  • 3 - Development through Life: Fundamental Patterns 24
  • 4 - Normal Growth and Development in the Infant and Young Child 43
  • 5 - The Adolescent Years 67
  • 6 - The Adult Years 99
  • 7 - Normal Aging 123
  • 8 - Aging with Illness 148
  • 9 - Long-Term Care: Living with Chronic Illness 169
  • 10 - Self-Efficacy 186
  • 11 - The Relationship between Health Practitioner and Patient 197
  • 12 - Bioethics 212
  • 13 - The Process of Making Judgments 230
  • 14 - Communication in the Therapeutic Context 244
  • Glossary of Terms 263
  • Index 269
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