The Garden of Eating: Food, Sex, and the Hunger for Meaning

By Jeremy Iggers | Go to book overview

6
The Gospel
according to
Weight Watchers

The next time I have a craving for anything I know is fattening or am tempted not to exercise, I will think about the new me, and I will be strong.

—RICHARD SIMMONS'S PROJECT ME PASSPORT VIDEO

It's the weight loss industry's ugly little secret: Diets don't work. But even if diets don't help people lose weight, they do offer a solution to another challenge of modern life: the hunger for structure and meaning.

Trouble is, it's a bad solution.


AS AMERICAN AS DIET COLA

Dieting has become a way of life for millions of Americans. Diet foods, once a specialty-food category largely reserved for diabetics, have entered the mainstream. Combined sales of Diet Coke and Diet Pepsi now exceed one billion dollars per year, and reduced-calorie prepared entrees such as Lean Cuisine, Weight Watchers, and Healthy Choice have captured a large share of the frozen-entree market.

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Garden of Eating: Food, Sex, and the Hunger for Meaning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - The Paradox of Plenty 1
  • 2 - The Foodie Revolution 23
  • 3 - Frapped Inside the Magic Kingdom 51
  • 4 - We Are What We Eat 81
  • 5 - Food, Sex, and the New Morality 107
  • 6 - The Gospel According to Weight Watchers 129
  • 7 - Making Peace with Food 149
  • 8 - Planting a Garden, Changing the World 167
  • Notes 187
  • Bibliography 193
  • Index 197
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 202

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.