The Right Brain and the Unconscious: Discovering the Stranger Within

By R. Joseph | Go to book overview

10
Unconscious Conflicts between Child,
Parent, and Self

Dreaming, Creativity, and the Right Brain

The right half of the brain has a number of divergent capacities and properties, not all of which are directly related to emotional functioning. Visual and pictorial imagery, making inferences, visual closure, and deducing the whole from an abundance of seemingly unrelated parts, geometrical analysis of visual space, and even some aspects of dreaming are made possible by the functional integrity of the right brain.

Many capacities, such as reading and dreaming, require both halves of the brain. For example, in dreaming, the right brain provides the visual imagery and the emotional coloring, and the left brain provides the dialogue or narrative. Just as it takes both halves of the brain to make music (the right providing melody, the left rhythm), we also need both brains in order to dream.

Similarly, although the right brain appears to be the more creative aspect of the mind, for example, in the form of artistic expression, creativity is possibly a product of having two brains and two minds. Indeed, the creative process itself is perhaps made possible, at least in part, by the interpretation and guesswork that occur when the two

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