Main Currents in Sociological Thought: Durkheim, Pareto, Weber - Vol. 2

By Raymond Aron; Richard Howard et al. | Go to book overview

C O N C L U S I O N

I SAID in the Introduction that the three writers I would discuss belong to three nationalities and a single historical period and that while their intellectual training was different, they were trying to advance the same discipline.

Taking these initial remarks as the point of departure for this final chapter, I shall first of all isolate the personal and national element in each of the three doctrines. Next, I shall review the historical context in which the three occur and the similar or different interpretations of their historical circumstances that they give. And finally, I shall summarize what seems to be the contribution of their generation to the advance of sociology.

The tone of the three writers varies. Durkheim's is dogmatic; Pareto's is ironic; and Weber's is pathetic. I believe that something of the tone of each has crept into my account.

Durkheim is demonstrating a truth which he wants to be both scientific and moral. Pareto is elaborating a scientific system which holds up to ridicule the illusions of humanitarians and the hopes of revolutionaries and in the end unmasks revolutionary and plutocrat alike. Weber is trying to understand the meaning of all existences, individual or collective, endured or chosen, without concealing either the weight of social necessities pressing on us or the ineluctable obligation to make decisions which can never be scientifically demonstrated.

The tone of each writer is explained both by the temperament of

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Main Currents in Sociological Thought: Durkheim, Pareto, Weber - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction i
  • ÉMile Durkheim *
  • I - De la Division Du Travail Social 11
  • II - Le Suicide 24
  • III - Les Formes éLéMentaires de la Vie Religieuse (1) 35
  • IV - Les Formes éLéMentaires de la Vie Religieuse (2) 47
  • V - Las RèGles de la MéThode Sociologique 59
  • VI - Socialism 70
  • VII - Philosophy and Morality 82
  • Vilfredo Pareto *
  • I - Logical and Nonlogical Actions 101
  • II - Residues 116
  • III - Residues and Derivations 128
  • IV - From Analysis to Synthesis 138
  • V - Elites and Cycles of Mutual Dependence 148
  • VI - The Significance of Pareto's Work 160
  • VII - Final Remarks on Pareto 169
  • Max Weber *
  • I - The Conception of Science 179
  • II - Science and Action 188
  • III - Historical Causality and Sociological Causality: the Ideal Types 197
  • IV - Philosophy of Values and Sociology of Religion 205
  • V - The Sociology of Religion: Economy and Society 220
  • VI - Political Sociology 233
  • Conclusion 253
  • Bibliographies 265
  • Index 269
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