The Nazi Persecution of the Churches, 1933-45

By J. S. Conway | Go to book overview

Appendix 7: From the special issue of Das
Schwarze Korps in honour of Hitler's fiftieth
birthday, 20 April 1939
a. My Führer!

So I stand on this day before your picture. This picture is colossal and without bounds, it is powerful, hard, beautiful and grand, it is so simple, good, plain and warm, more, it is father, mother, brother, in one, and it is still more. It bears the greatest years of my life, encompasses the quiet hours of meditation, the days of all difficulty and fears; it is the sun of most faithful fulfilment, the victory that was always the beginning of new duties and new fields of endeavour. The more I try to grasp it, the wider and brighter, without end, it is for me, yet never strange and far.

You are the Führer: without commanding, you live and are the law. You are love and strength, my heart is full in thinking of you on this day; too full to say all the best wishes and my thanks to you.

You are freedom, for you gave duty the meaning which imparts joy, strength and substance to all work. You took the curse of sweat, of hardship away from this nation which on this day holds its course in silent awe and is with you.

So you are now in a dome of millionfold love with its cupola arching up into luminous heights, millions of hearts beat faster and hotter on this high day in your life, and as your life is ours, it is a high day, a festive day for all Germans. And we who hoped to present you on this day with strength and blood from our love, we feel, as always, anew, even on this, your birthday, that your generous gift which makes us

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