War on Two Fronts: Shiloh to Gettysburg

By John Cannan | Go to book overview

U.S. GRANT


Capturing Vicksburg

After a few bloody repulses, Grant found he could make little headway against the almost impenetrable earthworks surrounding Vicksburg. Thus, both sides settled down to a long drawn out siege in which the Federals continuously threw shells into the enemy ranks and the town itself. In less than two months, lacking food and supplies, with no hope of relief in sight, Pemberton decided to surrender, with Vicksburg capitulating on 4 July 1863. The fall of the town culminated Grant's most brilliant triumph and continued his spectacular rise to fame. His recollections of the siege are taken from Personal Memories of U.S. Grant.

I now determined upon a regular siege—to "outcamp the enemy" as it were, and to incur no more losses. The experience of the 22d convinced officers and men that this was best, and they went to work on the defenses and approaches with a will. With the navy holding the river, the investment of Vicksburg was complete. As long as we could hold our position the enemy was limited in supplies of food, men and munitions of war to what they had on hand. These could not last always.

The crossing of troops at Bruinsburg commenced April 30th. On the 18th of May the army was in rear of Vicksburg. On the 19th, just twenty days after the crossing, the city was completely invested and an assault had been made: five distinct battles (besides continuous skirmishing) had been fought and won by the Union forces; the capital of the State had fallen and its arsenals, military manufactories and everything useful for military purposes had been destroyed; an average of about one hundred and eighty miles had been marched by the troops engaged; but five days' rations had been issued, and no forage; over six thousand prisoners had been captured, and as many more of the enemy had been killed or wounded; twenty-seven heavy cannon and sixty-one field-pieces had

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War on Two Fronts: Shiloh to Gettysburg
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface to the Series 9
  • Chapter I - Fort Henry and Fort Donelson *
  • Gunboats on the Tennessee 13
  • The Defense of Fort Donelson 18
  • Fort Donelson Surrenders 27
  • Chapter II - Pea Ridge *
  • Bloody Arkansas 56
  • Chapter III - Shiloh *
  • U.S. Grant Shiloh 62
  • Shiloha Private's View 76
  • Behind Confederate Lines 89
  • Drummer Boy of Shiloh 103
  • Chapter IX - Kentucky Invaded *
  • The Iuka-Corinth Campaign 106
  • A Yankee in Mississippi 125
  • My Old Kentucky Home 135
  • When Johnny Comes Marching Home 136
  • Chapter V - Vicksburg *
  • The Perryville Campaign 138
  • Charge of the First Tennessee at Perryville 161
  • On to Vicksburg.. 165
  • Champion Hills and Black River 178
  • Capturing Vicksburg 190
  • Treating the Wounded at Vicksburg 203
  • Chapter VI - Chancellorsville *
  • Hooker Takes Command 214
  • The Chancellorsville Campaign 222
  • Lee Triumphant 238
  • Routing the Yankees 271
  • Jackson's Mortal Wound 283
  • Misadventures in the Wilderness 292
  • Behind Confederate Lines 302
  • Chapter VII - The Road to Gettysburg *
  • Riding with J.E.B Stuart 310
  • On to Gettysburg 326
  • The Iron Brigade's Great Battle 330
  • Chapter VIII - The Second Day of Slaughter *
  • Gettysburgthe Second Day 342
  • The Stand of the 20th Maine 357
  • Until God Stopped Them.. 365
  • Both Sides Were Whipped .. 371
  • On the Attack against Sickles 375
  • Under Fire 383
  • Chapter IX - Highwater Mark of the Confederacy *
  • In Pickett's Ranks 390
  • All This Has Been My Fault.. 395
  • Retreat from Gettysburg 401
  • The Girl I Left behind 411
  • When This Cruel War Is over 412
  • Sources 413
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