Human Resource Development: The New Trainer's Guide

By Edward E. Scannell; Les Donaldson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Lesson Planning

Plan your work; work your plan.

This well-worn phrase still holds good advice for both the novice and the "pro" in conducting human resource programs.While senior trainers may not agree on a particular format or model for lesson planning, they all agree on the necessity of having some kind of working papers. This chapter will suggest outlines for your consideration and offer some sound and workable ideas about how to construct a written lesson plan.
What Is a Lesson Plan?
A lesson plan is simply a blueprint that identifies the basic five Ws (who, what, where, when, and why), with a few other items thrown in. It includes the audience (who), the topic and content (what), the location (where), the time frames (when), and the objectives (why).While these are important elements, a good lesson plan also includes additional items such as those suggested in Figure 5-1.
Program Content—Lesson Planning
An important part of the preparation for your session lies in your lesson-planning effort. As suggested, a lesson plan can take any of several forms and is merely a guideline for you to follow in your presentation.There are several good reasons for constructing a lesson plan for every session in which you are involved.
The plan will help you stay on the proper track and lead you to your stated objectives.
Properly written, your lesson plan will give the sequence and priorities of the topics you want to cover, providing a systematic and logical order of the knowledge, skills, or attitudes you will discuss.

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Human Resource Development: The New Trainer's Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - So You're Going to be a Trainer 4
  • Chapter 2 - Designing Effective Training Programs 14
  • Chapter 3 - Determining Training Needs 20
  • Chapter 4 - Instructional Objectives 32
  • Chapter 5 - Lesson Planning 40
  • Chapter 6 - Methods of Instruction 49
  • Chapter 7 - Audiovisuals in Training 59
  • Chapter 8 - Computer-Assisted Training 72
  • Chapter 9 - Communication 80
  • Chapter 10 - Principles of Learning 93
  • Chapter 11 - Motivation 101
  • Chapter 12 - Facilitation Skills 114
  • Chapter 13 - Presentation Skills 120
  • Chapter 14 - Planning a Meeting 129
  • Chapter 15 - Conducting a Meeting 140
  • Chapter 16 - Experiential Learning Activities 153
  • Chapter 17 - Problem Participants 161
  • Chapter 18 - Evaluation 165
  • Chapter 19 - The All-Star Trainer 183
  • Selected References 192
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