Human Resource Development: The New Trainer's Guide

By Edward E. Scannell; Les Donaldson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 13
Presentation Skills

Unaccustomed as I am....

In a recent well-publicized listing of all the fears of the American people, the number one fear was "speaking before a group." Not surprising to most of us, this fear is one to which we can probably all relate.

Certainly we all recognize the importance of a well-planned and well-presented training program. We are probably a little envious when we see and hear a seasoned trainer who seems to have the uncanny ability to keep the audience members "sitting on the edge of their chairs" awaiting the speaker's next words.

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Human Resource Development: The New Trainer's Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - So You're Going to be a Trainer 4
  • Chapter 2 - Designing Effective Training Programs 14
  • Chapter 3 - Determining Training Needs 20
  • Chapter 4 - Instructional Objectives 32
  • Chapter 5 - Lesson Planning 40
  • Chapter 6 - Methods of Instruction 49
  • Chapter 7 - Audiovisuals in Training 59
  • Chapter 8 - Computer-Assisted Training 72
  • Chapter 9 - Communication 80
  • Chapter 10 - Principles of Learning 93
  • Chapter 11 - Motivation 101
  • Chapter 12 - Facilitation Skills 114
  • Chapter 13 - Presentation Skills 120
  • Chapter 14 - Planning a Meeting 129
  • Chapter 15 - Conducting a Meeting 140
  • Chapter 16 - Experiential Learning Activities 153
  • Chapter 17 - Problem Participants 161
  • Chapter 18 - Evaluation 165
  • Chapter 19 - The All-Star Trainer 183
  • Selected References 192
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