Human Resource Development: The New Trainer's Guide

By Edward E. Scannell; Les Donaldson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 16
Experiential
Learning Activities

Using Games and Exercises

Introduction

Experienced HRD professionals fully understand that the audiences of the new millennium are considerably different from their counterparts of even a few years ago. They are younger, more educated, often less formal, and really are interested in learning. They want information that is practical, relevant, timely, and user-friendly. They want to learn to be sure—but they also want to have fun in the process!


Using Games in Training Programs

Interactive exercises or games have been used to liven up presentations ever since it was discovered that people have a very short attention span. In fact, there are studies to suggest that the average attention span of most adults is at best three to four minutes! If you doubt that, think of a meeting or presentation you may have attended last week and ask yourself how much of what that speaker or facilitator said last week can you remember?

While we've already addressed the laws of learning in Chapter 10, it might be appropriate at this point to discuss the "Law of Forgetting." In essence, the law of forgetting states that immediately upon hearing something, the average person forgets 50% of what he or she has just heard! Startling to be sure, but it's true.

Let's reiterate. As point of fact, some recent studies claim that the span of attention for most of us varies anywhere from ten seconds to three or four minutes. It's easy to see, then, why people become easily bored (or underwhelmed) with overly technical material and respond much better when there is life and variety in the training programs and presentations they attend.

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Human Resource Development: The New Trainer's Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - So You're Going to be a Trainer 4
  • Chapter 2 - Designing Effective Training Programs 14
  • Chapter 3 - Determining Training Needs 20
  • Chapter 4 - Instructional Objectives 32
  • Chapter 5 - Lesson Planning 40
  • Chapter 6 - Methods of Instruction 49
  • Chapter 7 - Audiovisuals in Training 59
  • Chapter 8 - Computer-Assisted Training 72
  • Chapter 9 - Communication 80
  • Chapter 10 - Principles of Learning 93
  • Chapter 11 - Motivation 101
  • Chapter 12 - Facilitation Skills 114
  • Chapter 13 - Presentation Skills 120
  • Chapter 14 - Planning a Meeting 129
  • Chapter 15 - Conducting a Meeting 140
  • Chapter 16 - Experiential Learning Activities 153
  • Chapter 17 - Problem Participants 161
  • Chapter 18 - Evaluation 165
  • Chapter 19 - The All-Star Trainer 183
  • Selected References 192
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