Margaret Fuller, Critic: Writings from the New-York Tribune, 1844-1846

By Judith Mattson Bean; Joel Myerson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This project has been supported by a number of scholars and institutions. Assistance in transcribing Fuller's words from darkened and aging copies of the New-York Tribune was essential to completing the full collection. Support for this work was provided by Texas Woman's University and the University of South Carolina. We appreciate the work of Camille Langston, Ginger Cotton, Ann Hoff, Lee Davinroy, Chris Nesmith, Ralph H. Orth, and Todd Richardson, who participated in this effort, and especially the work of Michael McLoughlin. Judith Bean wishes to thank especially Sondra Ferstl, Elizabeth Snapp, and Lucyle Hook. Joel Myerson thanks Robert Newman, chair of the English department of the University of South Carolina, for his support.

We are also indebted to a number of libraries and their staffs who assisted in the work of examining Fuller's papers: the Boston Public Library, the Houghton Library of Harvard University, the Massachusetts Historical Society, the New York Public Library, the Blagg-Huey Library of Texas Woman's University, and the University of South Carolina.

We received helpful encouragement and suggestions from many Fuller scholars. Wilma Ebbitt's 1943 dissertation editing some fifty of Fuller's texts from the Tribune proved a valuable source of information. We are grateful to Professor Ebbitt, as well as members of the Margaret Fuller Society, and especially Susan Belasco and Robert N. Hudspeth. Our introduction has benefited from suggestions made by Larry J. Reynolds. Susan Heath has edited the work with precision. We owe a special debt to Jennifer Crewe of Columbia University Press, who helped us through the various stages of this project and was instrumental in helping us achieve the final, comprehensive result.

Judith Mattson Bean Joel Myerson

-xiii-

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