Margaret Fuller, Critic: Writings from the New-York Tribune, 1844-1846

By Judith Mattson Bean; Joel Myerson | Go to book overview

‘American Facts’

Such is the title of a volume just issued from the press:—a grand title, which suggests the epic poet or the philosopher. The purpose, however, of the work is modest. It is merely a compilation, from which those who have lived at some distance from the great highway may get answers to their questions, as to events and circumstances which have escaped them. It is one of those books which will be valued in the back-woods.

It would be a great book, indeed, and one that would require the eye and heart of a great man,—great as a judge, great as a seer, and great as a prophet— that could select for us and present in harmonious outline the true American facts. To select the right point of view supposes command of the field.

Such a man must be attentive, a quiet observer of the slighter signs of growth. But he must not be one to dwell superstitiously on details, nor one to hasten to conclusions. He must have the eye of the eagle, the courage of the lion, the patience of the worm, and faith such as is the prerogative of Man alone, and of Man on the highest step of his culture.

We doubt not the destiny of our Country, that she is destined to accomplish great things for Human Nature and be the mother of a nobler race, perhaps, than the world has yet known. But she has been so false to the scheme made out at her nativity that it is now hard to say which way that destiny points. We can hardly point out the true American facts, without some idea of the true character of America. Only one thing seems clear, that the energy here at work is very great, though the men employed in carrying out its purposes may have generally no more individual ambition to understand those purposes or cherish noble ones of their own, than the coral insect through whose restless working new continents are upheaved from Ocean's breast.

Such a man passing in a boat from one extremity of the Mississippin to

____________________
n
Mississipi [Mississippi

-126-

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